Annual Report

ITSReviewAnnual2015

Annual report There are many national ITS associations all over the world. At a guess, maybe fifty of differing sizes and undertaking different activities, but all dedicated to the promotion of Intelligent Transport Systems. There are the big three: ERTICO, ITS America and ITS Japan. ITS (UK) is one of the longest established of the next tier of purely national associations, having been established in 1992. Most other national ITS associations were established within the last fifteen years. The UK has a strong tradition of professional associations going back to the nineteenth century and even earlier, so it is hardly surprising that the country has one for ITS. But in many other countries there is not that strong collegiate tradition, and the existence of so many national ITS associations is perhaps more surprising. ITS is a very broad based discipline and that is perhaps the reason why we have so many colleague associations. Practitioners come from backgrounds in IT, electronic engineering, geography, transport planning, civil engineering, communications technology, and even more disciplines. The organisations involved in getting ITS implemented can be Government departments, Local Authorities, other road operators including commercial ones, manufacturers, designers, system integrators, police forces, consultants and probably more. This makes it logical to have an association where all these disparate people and organisations can find a focus for knowledge sharing, contacts and advice - and work jointly to promote the take up of the systems and services they all firmly believe in as an essential ingredient of Jennie Martin, ITS (UK) - Secretary General Neal Skelton ITS (UK) - Head of Professional Services 16 ITS REVIEW Annual Review 2015 an effective and user-friendly transport network. ITS (UK) with its 144 corporate members, 900 plus active individuals, secretariat of five staff, and annual income of about £300K is large by comparison with most of our international colleagues, but certainly not large in the greater scheme of things. However, we follow the wellestablished UK norm for how to operate a non-profit organisation, keeping costs to a minimum while still treating staff and suppliers fairly, and use our resources wisely to serve our Members and to promote the takeup of ITS in the UK and UK expertise abroad. We are very lucky to have so many supportive Members, both on the corporate level and individuals, who freely give time and expertise enabling us to provide much better services. Our Interest Groups (see page 12) are an excellent example of this, with the Chairmen, Honorary Secretaries and Group membership sharing often world-class expertise within their topics. We have some exciting plans for the next year at the time of writing (February 2015): This autumn we will hold an event across all our Interest Groups themed on automated vehicles. Our Connected Vehicles Interest Group contains many world leading experts in the technologies which make driverless vehicles possible. But other Interest Groups will also be able to contribute crucial insights: the Local Authority / Urban IG on how these vehicles will fit into the urban transport sphere, the Security and Resilience Interest Group on the issues of malicious or accidental hacking of such vehicles’ systems, the Automotive User IG on the crucial questions of Human Factors for those who will use these vehicles or interact with them from the outside, the Smart Environment IG on their environmental impacts, and so on. Getting these experts in one room and writing up the outcomes must yield a valuable contribution to research in this fast evolving area. There is plenty of potential here for UK organisations to get involved in international research, development and testing activities and ITS (UK) will work to make sure that our Members get as much out of this as possible. We have two new White Papers in development: one on using mobile communications for ITS, and not unrelated, another on the importance of ubiquity of communications to UK economic growth. There are many good reasons why slow connections and coverage blackspots are bad for many different UK agendas, from the business one to the personal wellbeing one, but poor communications performance is very detrimental to the use of ITS and at a glance: 36 Foundation Members 97 Corporate Members 11 Associate Members President: Steven Norris Chairman: Sharon Kindleysides, Kapsch TrafficCom Vice Chair: Dr Alan Stevens, TRL Technical Director: Joanne Dodds, URS Finance Director: Gary Umpleby, Hogia Membership Director: Graeme Scott, IBI Group Communications Director: Giles Perkins, Mouchel International Director: Richard Harris, Xerox The Directors of the parent company, RTI Focus (UK) Ltd Jennie Martin ITS (UK), Company Secretary Mike McDonald Southampton University Alan Stevens TRL Richard Harris Xerox Neal Skelton ITS (UK) Ian Patey Mouchel Sharon Kindleysides Kapsch Trevor Platt Nicander Fraser Sommerville Atkins


ITSReviewAnnual2015
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