Automotive telemetry system designed at Coventry University

ITSReviewAnnual2015

Automotive Telemetry System designed at Coventry University Afirst version of a telemetry system, designed by students, comprises 18 sensors and a GPS receiver. The short range communication between a car and a base-station has been implemented using a radio modem which transmits the data using the spread-spectrum modulation method (also known as the frequency-hopping method). This allows one to avoid the interference between several transmitters which can work in the same time on different cars during the cars racing competition on the same racing track. Additionally, this type of a transmitter provides the high security of the data-communication due to the fact that both devices (a transmitter on a car and a receiver on a base-station) are automatically synchronised on the 34 ITS REVIEW Annual Review 2015 same frequency and in the same time. Thus, it is not possible to decode the transmitted information by people from other cars racing teams, rather than by people who are operating these particular devices in this particular team. The telemetry system includes a GPS receiver and integrated INS. This system’s integration allows one to continuously monitor the vehicle’s position even in the case when a signal from the GPS receiver disappears. It is well known fact that the signal from GPS satellites may not penetrate concrete structures (buildings in the City and tunnels), thus the information about a car’s position may not be determined. When such the situation happens, then the INS (which is based on a gyroscope and odometer) can compensate the missing information for the vehicle’s navigation. Another version of the telemetry system is based on the GSM/GPRS modem which allows one to transmit the information from vehicle’s sensors via the mobile-phone network. Thus, these data can be monitored anywhere in the world and anytime. The complete telemetry system, based on the GSM/GPRS modem, consists of four nodes: Node-1 (the pedal and steering wheel position monitoring); Node-2 (the water/oil temperature and pressure monitoring, front At Coventry University in the Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering I have designed and taught new modules: “Intelligent Transport Systems” (from the year 2006) and “Telematics” (from the year 2009) for the Automotive Engineering course. In order to supplement the theoretical material with practical exercises on these modules, I developed several practical courseworks, such for example, as: modelling and simulation of road traffic networks in Coventry City using experimental data; design of an autonomous vehicle; a telemetry system based on the Controller Area Network (CAN-bus); design of an automotive cluster for the monitoring of parameters from vehicle’s sensors on a car’s dash-board; design of an automotive telematics system for the monitoring of vehicle’s parameters in the real-time using the dataacquisition hardware and GPS receiver; and design of the telemetry system based on a short-range radio transmitter and receiver. Also, students did final year projects on the above topics under my supervision. In this article I would like to emphasise on some of the above projects, i.e. automotive telemetry system design based on the CAN-bus, GPS receiver, INS (Inertial Navigation System), wireless data communication based on a short range radio transmitter, and a telemetry system based on the GPRS modem via the mobilephone network. Yuri A. Vershinin Senior Lecturer in Automotive Electronics, Intelligent Transport Systems and Telematics Applied Research Group, Coventry University  A car with a wireless telemetry system on the Bruntingthorpe Proving Ground


ITSReviewAnnual2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above