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ITSReviewAnnual2015

The technology to implement an urban mobility service exists today www.its-ukreview.org 63 Richard Harris Director Communications and Marketing, International Transportation and Government, Xerox of life? The development of cleaner alternative fuel sources represents an important long range solution, but does not address immediate problems such as congestion and parking shortages. Intelligent transportation systems, however, that apply data analytics to provide more efficient and sustainable transportation choices can make an impact today and create a foundation of sustainability for the future. New mobility Regardless of the availability of public transport, millions of people in cities own automobiles. People spend thousands of pounds a year to purchase, maintain, fuel and park cars they use on average only 5 percent of the time. Because of that investment, most people feel compelled to use their car despite traffic congestion, parking difficulty, and fuel costs. New mobility is about giving people choices that make getting around easier, more convenient and sustainable. In the near future, mobility will be regarded as a service that integrates different modes of transportation seamlessly. Instead of tying up large amounts of money in a car that isn’t used 95 percent of the time, for instance, you may subscribe to a service that allows easy access to public transport, car sharing, and bike sharing through a universal payment system accessed through an app on your cell phone. The goal is not necessarily to eliminate car ownership among city dwellers, but rather to provide attractive options to those who would prefer not to own a car, or would like to increase their mobility through easier access to different modes of transport. Changing lifestyle preferences in younger generations support the concept of mobility as a service. In the last ten years, the number of people under 35 with a driver’s license has decreased 6 percent while total vehicle mileage has decreased by 10 percent. To attract subscribers and provide a viable alternative to car ownership, the mobility service has to be reliable, cost-effective and easy to use. That’s where the power of data analytics comes in. One backend system enables service providers – think bike share, car share, and public transport – to transact with mobility subscribers on a single payment platform. The system collects valuable data that can be used to manage operations efficiently and customize services according to the preferences of individual users. Mobility in action: a day in the life of a city dweller The new mobility promises the sort of freedom of movement first associated with the automobile. Imagine Cindy, a city resident, has subscribed to the city’s new mobility service. It’s now Monday morning and Cindy is headed to work. The mobility app on her phone, through which Cindy has specified her parameters for budget and timing, suggests the 7am express train from to the Station a short distance from her workplace. With the weather forecast of blue skies and warm temperatures, her mobility app, which knows her preferences, recommends bike share for her commute home. She clicks yes on her phone and a bike is automatically reserved for her from the hub near her workplace. She puts her riding clothes in a small backpack and walks to the train station where she taps her phone at the turnstile to board the train. At the end of her workday, Cindy changes into her riding clothes and walks to the bikeshare hub where her bike is waiting for her. From there she can ride along the dedicated bike lane – created by the city to encourage bike use – to the path that heads south along the river towards her home. She drops off the bike at the closest bike-share hub, which is right off the river path, and hops on a bus to take a five-minute ride to the stop in front of her home. That weekend Cindy decides to go to a football match in the city. The car pool feature on her mobility app notifies her that two of her friends also plan to go to the game and would like to share a car with her. The fee for the car share is automatically split among the three subscribers. Cindy’s friend picks her up in the car and the app chooses a route based on how much they wish to pay for tolls and parking and how far they wish to walk to the stadium. They take the High Occupancy Vehicle lane, as they have three people in the car, and the navigation system directs them to open parking spaces that meet their budget and their request to be no further than a ten-minute walk from the stadium. Lifestyle benefits Instead of limiting Cindy’s mobility, not owning a car has increased it. Cindy’s mobility subscription frees her from the expense and commitments of owning and maintaining her own car. She has access to the most suitable travel mode for her life style and changing needs, and knows that she is also contributing 〉〉


ITSReviewAnnual2015
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